Parkinsons Disease Articles A-Z

Dosing for Ropinirole - Parcopa Medication Information

This page contains links to eMedTV Parkinsons Disease Articles containing information on subjects from Dosing for Ropinirole to Parcopa Medication Information. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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Descriptions of Articles
  • Dosing for Ropinirole
    Dosing for ropinirole is determined by a doctor -- never adjust your dose unless specifically told to do so. This eMedTV page explains typical doses for ropinirole (although this varies for each patient). Tips on taking the medicine are also given.
  • Drug Interactions for Ropinirole
    Some drug interactions for ropinirole can cause your body to metabolize the drug differently than intended. This eMedTV resource lists several drug interactions (such as ciprofloxacin) and offers information on their potential effects.
  • Drug Interactions With Amantadine
    Drugs that may interact with amantadine include stimulants, FluMist, and antipsychotic medicines. This eMedTV article outlines other medicines that may cause drug interactions with amantadine and describes the possible effects of these interactions.
  • Drug Interactions With Bromocriptine
    Antipsychotics, nitrates, and certain antidepressants may cause bromocriptine drug interactions. As this eMedTV article explains, drug interactions could increase your risk for side effects or reduce the effectiveness of the medications.
  • Drug Interactions With Coenzyme Q10
    Blood pressure medicines, chemotherapy drugs, and warfarin may cause drug interactions with coenzyme Q10. This eMedTV Web page describes the potentially negative consequences these interactions can have and steps your doctor may take to prevent them.
  • Drug Interactions With Pramipexole
    Some drug interactions with pramipexole can increase your risk of side effects. This page from the eMedTV library lists the medications that can negatively interact with pramipexole and describes the complications that these interactions may cause.
  • Drug Interactions With Procyclidine
    Certain antipsychotics and antidepressants can cause drug interactions with procyclidine. This eMedTV Web resource lists other medications that may interact with procyclidine and explains the potential complications these interactions can cause.
  • Drug Interactions With Selegiline
    Drugs that may interact with selegiline include antidepressants, stimulants, and many cold medicines. This eMedTV page outlines other medicines that may cause drug interactions with selegiline and describes the negative effects of these interactions.
  • Early Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease
    This eMedTV page describes some early symptoms of Parkinson's disease, such as being overly tired, having difficulty getting out of a chair, and talking softly. This page also explains how many of these early signs are dismissed as normal aging.
  • Exalon Patch
    The Exelon Patch is used for treating mild to moderate dementia due to Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease. This eMedTV segment explains how to use the patch and describes the drug's effects. Exalon Patch is a common misspelling of Exelon Patch.
  • Exelon for Parkinson's
    As this eMedTV article explains, Parkinson's-related dementia can be treated with a prescription drug called Exelon. This Web page talks about using Exelon for this purpose, with a link to more detailed information.
  • Exelon Patch
    The Exelon Patch is used for the treatment of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's dementia. This eMedTV article describes this medication in more detail, explains how it works, and offers general dosing information for the drug.
  • Exelon Patch and Weight Loss
    Weight loss appears to be one of the most common side effects of the Exelon patch. This page from the eMedTV archives offers more information on the Exelon Patch and weight loss, and explains what you should do if extreme weight loss occurs.
  • Exelon Patch Dosing
    The usual starting Exelon Patch dose is one patch, applied once daily. This part of the eMedTV library provides more detailed Exelon Patch dosing guidelines, including information on how to switch from Exelon capsules or solution.
  • Exelon Patch Interactions
    NSAIDs, anticholinergic drugs, and cholinergic medicines may interact with the Exelon Patch. This eMedTV resource lists specific products from these drug classes and describes the potential effects of negative Exelon Patch interactions.
  • Exelon Patch Side Effects
    Fatigue, insomnia, and vomiting are some of the most common Exelon Patch side effects. As this eMedTV Web page explains, while most side effects are mild, some may require prompt medical attention, such as anxiety, depression, or severe weight loss.
  • Exelon Patch Uses
    The Exelon Patch is used for treating dementia in people with Parkinson's or Alzheimer's disease. This eMedTV Web page discusses Exelon Patch uses in more detail, explains how the medication works, and describes its effects.
  • Exelon Patch Warnings and Precautions
    If you weigh less than 110 pounds, you may be at a higher risk for Exelon Patch side effects. This eMedTV article offers other important Exelon Patch warnings and precautions, and lists potential side effects that may occur with this medication.
  • Famous People With Parkinson's Disease
    Many famous people with Parkinson's disease have helped increase the amount of research for the condition. This eMedTV page lists some famous people with Parkinson's disease, such as actor Michael J. Fox and former boxer Muhammad Ali.
  • Gene Therapy and Parkinson's
    As this eMedTV page explains, gene therapy may prove to be a promising treatment for Parkinson's disease. This article discusses the use of gene therapy in more detail, including information on the use of viruses in this form of treatment.
  • Generic Akineton
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, generic Akineton (biperiden hydrochloride) is not available in generic form. This page discusses why there are no generic Akineton products available even though patents for this medication have expired.
  • Generic Apokyn
    No generic Apokyn (apomorphine) products are currently licensed for sale. This selection from the eMedTV Web site offers information on when a generic version of Apokyn may become available and explains the difference between Apokyn and apomorphine.
  • Generic Artane
    Artane (trihexyphenidyl hydrochloride) is only available in generic form. This eMedTV page describes the various strengths and forms available for generic Artane and lists some of the drug companies that currently manufacture these generic products.
  • Generic Azilect
    Azilect (rasagiline mesylate) is not yet available in generic form. This eMedTV article offers information on when generic Azilect products may become available and lists certain factors that may extend the exclusivity period of brand-name Azilect.
  • Generic Cogentin
    Generic forms of Cogentin (benztropine mesylate) are available. This eMedTV page lists the forms and strengths of generic Cogentin that are available. For example, brand-name Cogentin tablets are no longer being made, but generic tablets are.
  • Generic Comtan
    As explained in this eMedTV Web selection, generic Comtan (entacapone) is now available. This article takes a closer look at this generic product, including who makes it and whether it is as good as the brand-name drug.
  • Generic Lodosyn
    Is Lodosyn (carbidopa) available in generic form? Yes, as this eMedTV segment explains, the generic version is currently sold in one strength. Who makes it and how does it compare? Read on to learn the answers.
  • Generic Mirapex ER
    As this eMedTV article discusses, there are no generic Mirapex ER (pramipexole ER) products available at this time. This page explores why there are currently no generic versions of this medication and explains when a generic might become available.
  • Generic Neupro
    This eMedTV article discusses why companies are not allowed to make generic versions of Neupro (rotigotine). It also explains when a generic Neupro might become available and describes circumstances that may come up to delay this date.
  • Generic Parcopa
    Generic versions of Parcopa are currently available on the market. This selection from the eMedTV Web site discusses generic Parcopa in detail, including information on how it compares to the brand-name version of the drug.
  • Generic Requip XL
    As explained in this eMedTV Web page, generic Requip XL (ropinirole XL) is available in several strengths and forms. This article takes a closer look at these generic products, including who makes them and whether they are as good as the brand-name drug.
  • Generic Sinemet
    As this eMedTV resource explains, Sinemet (carbidopa-levodopa) is available in generic form. This page lists the available strengths of generic Sinemet and explains how the FDA has determined that these generics are equivalent to the brand-name drug.
  • Generic Sinemet CR
    This eMedTV page explains that there is a generic Sinemet CR (carbidopa-levodopa CR). This page lists the available strengths of this generic medicine and explains how the FDA has determined that generic Sinemet CR is as good as the brand-name drug.
  • Generic Stalevo
    As this eMedTV page explains, Stalevo (carbidopa-levodopa-entacapone) can be purchased in generic form. This article takes a closer look at generic Stalevo, with details on who manufactures it and which strengths are available.
  • Generic Tasmar
    At this time, there is no generic Tasmar (tolcapone) available in the United States. This eMedTV page explains why no generic versions of Tasmar are likely to become available until at least December 2012.
  • Generic Zelapar
    There are currently no approved generic forms of Zelapar (orally disintegrating selegiline). This eMedTV page covers why there is no generic Zelapar and explains that July 2014 is the earliest date that a generic version could become available.
  • Lodosyn
    Lodosyn is a drug used to treat Parkinson's disease and Parkinson-like symptoms due to other causes. This eMedTV resource explains how the drug works, describes the effects of Lodosyn, and lists possible side effects that may occur.
  • Lodosyn and Breastfeeding
    It is currently not known whether Lodosyn (carbidopa) passes through breast milk in humans. This eMedTV page includes more information on Lodosyn and breastfeeding, and describes the problems that may occur if the drug is used while breastfeeding.
  • Lodosyn and Pregnancy
    It is generally recommended that pregnant women avoid taking Lodosyn (carbidopa). This eMedTV page offers more a more in-depth look at Lodosyn and pregnancy, including information on why the drug was given a pregnancy Category C rating by the FDA.
  • Lodosyn Dosage
    Your Lodosyn dosage will be determined based on your current dose of levodopa and other carbidopa products. This eMedTV page explains how Lodosyn dosing works in more detail and lists the maximum daily carbidopa dose recommended for most people.
  • Lodosyn Drug Information
    Are you looking for information about Lodosyn? As this eMedTV article explains, Lodosyn is a drug used to treat Parkinson's disease. This resource gives a brief overview of this medication, with details on side effects, other uses, and more.
  • Lodosyn Drug Interactions
    Medications that could lead to Lodosyn drug interactions include phenytoin, isoniazid, and MAOIs. This eMedTV Web page provides a more complete list of medicines that may cause levodopa (and therefore Lodosyn) drug interactions.
  • Lodosyn Overdose
    It is not known what to expect from an overdose of Lodosyn (carbidopa), as it is always taken with levodopa. This eMedTV article lists reported symptoms of a levodopa overdose and describes various treatments that are available for a Lodosyn overdose.
  • Lodosyn Side Effects
    Bothersome but usually not dangerous Lodosyn side effects include gas, fatigue, and flushing. This eMedTV article lists other bothersome (but not serious) side effects of Lodosyn and also explains which side effects may require medical attention.
  • Lodosyn Uses
    Lodosyn is used for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. This article from the eMedTV archives explores Lodosyn uses in more detail, describes how the medication works, and explains whether it may be used in children or for off-label purposes.
  • Lodosyn Warnings and Precautions
    Lodosyn (with levodopa) can cause or worsen mental illnesses, due to its effects on dopamine. This eMedTV article offers other Lodosyn warnings and precautions, and includes important information on who should not use this particular product.
  • Mirapex ER
    Mirapex ER is a long-acting medication prescribed for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. This section of the eMedTV Web site provides a complete overview of this medicine, including details on how it works, safety precautions, side effects, and more.
  • Mirapex ER and Breastfeeding
    In general, it may not be safe to use Mirapex ER (pramipexole ER) while nursing. This eMedTV page further explores breastfeeding and Mirapex ER, including the results of animal studies done on this topic and potential problems this medication may cause.
  • Mirapex ER and Impulse Control
    As this eMedTV page explains, compulsive behaviors such as gambling and hypersexuality may occur with Mirapex ER (pramipexole ER). This article further discusses impulse control and Mirapex ER, including information on how often these problems occur.
  • Mirapex ER and Pregnancy
    As this eMedTV page explains, animal studies on pregnancy and Mirapex ER (pramipexole ER) suggest that the drug may not be safe for pregnant women. This page describes problems that occurred in animal studies of this pregnancy Category C medication.
  • Mirapex ER Dosage
    Your Mirapex ER dosage is based on your response to the medication and other medical conditions you have. This eMedTV article describes other factors that may affect your dosage, offers specific dosing guidelines, and lists tips for taking this drug.
  • Mirapex ER Drug Interactions
    Products that can potentially interact with Mirapex ER include verapamil, diltiazem, and antipsychotics. This eMedTV page lists other medicines that may interfere with Mirapex ER and describes the possible consequences of these drug interactions.
  • Mirapex ER Medication Information
    Mirapex ER is a medicine prescribed for treating Parkinson's disease. This eMedTV page provides important information on the medication, including possible side effects of Mirapex ER and general safety precautions to be aware of before taking this drug.
  • Mirapex ER Overdose
    As this eMedTV Web article discusses, if you overdose on Mirapex ER, you may experience any of the usual side effects, although more severely. This page lists possible overdose symptoms and describes various treatment options that are available.
  • Mirapex ER Side Effects
    Some of the commonly reported side effects of Mirapex ER include drowsiness, nausea, and constipation. This eMedTV Web resource explores the severity of these side effects and describes which ones may require immediate medical attention.
  • Mirapex ER Uses
    Mirapex ER is prescribed for the treatment of Parkinson's disease in adults. This selection from the eMedTV Web library explains how the medication works and also lists possible off-label Mirapex ER uses, such as the treatment of fibromyalgia or tremors.
  • Mirapex ER Warnings and Precautions
    You may not be able to use Mirapex ER safely if you have low blood pressure or kidney disease. This eMedTV page lists important Mirapex ER warnings and precautions to be aware of, including potentially serious side effects and possible drug interactions.
  • Natural Cure for Parkinson's Disease
    Vitamin E, CoQ10, and ginkgo biloba are among the natural remedies for Parkinson's disease. This eMedTV page describes other products that may offer a natural "cure" for this disease and covers tips on what to consider before using these products.
  • Neupro
    Neupro can be used to treat Parkinson's disease or restless legs syndrome (RLS). This eMedTV Web selection presents more details on this medicated skin patch, with information on how it is used, possible side effects, safety concerns, and more.
  • Neupro and Breastfeeding
    This eMedTV Web page explains that women may not want to use Neupro (rotigotine) while breastfeeding, as it is unknown if it passes through breast milk. This resource explores some things to consider before using this medicated patch while nursing.
  • Neupro and Pregnancy
    There may be risks associated with using Neupro (rotigotine) during pregnancy. This eMedTV article takes a closer look at what happened during animal studies of this drug and whether a healthcare provider can still prescribe it to a pregnant woman.
  • Neupro as a Treatment for Parkinson's
    If you have Parkinson's disease, you may benefit from treatment with a medicated patch called Neupro. This eMedTV segment takes a brief look at how this medicine can help relieve symptoms of this disease. It also links to more details.
  • Neupro Dosage
    Available as a skin patch, Neupro is applied once daily to treat Parkinson's disease and RLS. This eMedTV Web selection examines dosing instructions for Neupro, including details on when to apply it and how long to leave it in place.
  • Neupro Drug Interactions
    Zyprexa, levodopa, and metoclopramide are just a few of the drugs that can interact with Neupro. This eMedTV Web page describes some of the complications that may occur with these interactions and explains how to reduce your risk of problems.
  • Neupro Overdose
    As this selection from the eMedTV Web library explains, using too much Neupro (rotigotine) may cause involuntary movements, confusion, or other problems. This article lists other possible effects and describes how these problems may be treated.
  • Neupro Patch for Parkinson's
    A doctor may prescribe Neupro patches for treating Parkinson's disease. This page of the eMedTV Web site discusses how this drug works to help relieve symptoms of this disease and offers a link to more information on uses of this medicine.
  • Neupro Patch Information
    This eMedTV article contains information on Neupro, a medicated skin patch prescribed to treat Parkinson's disease and restless legs syndrome (RLS). This page gives an overview of side effects, dosing, and safety concerns. It also links to more details.
  • Neupro Patch Instructions
    Apply a Neupro patch once daily to treat symptoms of Parkinson's disease or restless legs syndrome. This eMedTV resource further discusses instructions for when and how to use Neupro patches. A link to more dosing guidelines is also provided.
  • Neupro Side Effects
    As this eMedTV article explains, common Neupro side effects include drowsiness, dizziness, and headaches. This resource also contains details on which reactions are potentially serious and require your healthcare provider's immediate attention.
  • Neupro Transdermal Patch
    As explained in this eMedTV page, Neupro transdermal patches work to treat Parkinson's disease and restless legs syndrome by affecting certain areas of the brain. This article lists side effects, explains how the patches work, and links to more details.
  • Neupro Uses
    Adults who have early or advanced forms of Parkinson's disease may receive treatment with Neupro. This eMedTV segment also explains how Neupro can be used for the treatment of restless legs syndrome. A description of how the drug works is also included.
  • Neupro Warnings and Precautions
    You may not be able to use Neupro if you have problems with your heart or blood pressure. This eMedTV segment discusses other important warnings for using Neupro safely, including precautions for people who have certain medical conditions.
  • Newpro
    Available by prescription, Neupro patches are applied to the skin to treat Parkinson's disease and RLS. This eMedTV page takes a look at this medicated patch, including dosing tips and side effects. Newpro is a common misspelling of Neupro.
  • Nuepro
    A doctor may prescribe Neupro to treat Parkinson's disease or restless legs syndrome (RLS). This eMedTV segment describes side effects of this drug, dosing guidelines, and more. Nuepro is a common misspelling of Neupro.
  • Parcopa
    Parcopa is a prescription medicine approved to treat Parkinson's disease and Parkinson-like symptoms. This eMedTV article contains an overview of Parcopa, including information on how this drug works, possible side effects, dosing tips, and more.
  • Parcopa and Breastfeeding
    This eMedTV Web page explains that one component of Parcopa does pass through breast milk and may affect a woman's ability to breastfeed. This article also covers what to do if you are taking Parcopa and breastfeeding.
  • Parcopa and Pregnancy
    As this eMedTV segment explains, animal studies indicate that Parcopa (orally disintegrating carbidopa-levodopa) may not be safe for use during pregnancy. This page further discusses Parcopa and pregnancy, and describes the problems that may occur.
  • Parcopa Dosage
    This eMedTV page explains that Parcopa dosing guidelines are different for each person, depending on how you respond to the medicine and other factors. This page discusses factors that may affect your Parcopa dosage and offers tips on taking the drug.
  • Parcopa Drug Interactions
    Parcopa can interact with several medicines, possibly increasing the risk of developing side effects. This eMedTV segment takes an in-depth look at several Parcopa drug interactions and describes the complications these interactions may cause.
  • Parcopa Medication Information
    As explained in this part of the eMedTV Web library, Parcopa is a medication used to treat Parkinson's disease. This article provides more information on Parcopa, including details on other uses of the medication.
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